“Hamanasi Mango Salsa”

mango salsaFrom our kitchen to you..

A fresh snack that takes 5 minutes to prepare …1 turn mango, 2 tablespoon lime juice, 1/2 onion, 2 tablespoon red belle peppers, 2 to 3 tablespoon cilantro,  salt to taste… option of Habanero maybe added.  Served with corn chips

A Paranda Star in the Making

IMG_8188Emilio Nathaniel Thomas was born, and lives in Dangriga, Belize. He is a talented singer-songwriter who has been performing Paranda music for 13 years.
Paranda is both a rhythm and a genre of music, its the music of the Garifuna people and its performed solely on acoustic instruments, namely the guitar, Garifuna drums, shakers, and turtle shells.

Emilio is passionate about keeping this style of music alive, and this comes through in his performance. Much of what he sings has been written himself, he says “my music is about togetherness and awareness of the goodness in life!” Its telling a folklore story which usually has a moral. His favorite song to sing is Yurumeina “because it reminds me of where I came from and how far I can go, by just believing, you can make it happen.”

His biggest musical inspiration is Aurelio Martinez, aka Aurelio, a well known Garifuna musician from Honduras, with roots in Garifuna culture.

Affectionately known as “Sasamu Garifuna” which means “wise”, one of his biggest accomplishments was touring through Europe in 2014 with the Garifuna Collectives, they performed in 10 countries over a period of 2 months.

In 2013 Emilio, had graduated from college and had been teaching music for almost 2 years when he decided to give everything up – why….? Because he needed to find his true self, the 6 months spent alone, played an instrumental role in shaping who he is as an artist and as an individual today. “I needed to take some time off to find my identity”. Emilio is seen as the next Paranda Icon in Belize, but with so many different opportunities coming his way he is still incredibly dedicated to his kids at Dellie Acadamy.

He is driven by his music, takes pride in his building his craft, loves sharing with others and learning more each day. In the future he would like to be touring different countries, sharing his music, culture and country with the rest of the world. But for now you can see Emilio every Sunday night, performing his favorite songs right here at Hamanasi from 6.30pm to 9.30pm.

 

“Happy Hour Drink Special: Christmas Breeze”

Ambro’s Happy Hour Drink special for today is ~ Christmas breeze!

1 ounce hyper vodka,

1 ounce 1 barrel dark rum,

ambro drink3/4 ounce lime juice

shake well together with mint leaves and 3 ounce sprite with a dash of grenadine syrup.

Serve on ice, sit back, relax and enjoy!

“Food and Fete ~ A Celebration Of Garifuna Cuisine”

Collage 2015-11-15 19_53_11 (3)On November 13th, 2015 our Excective Chef Marcia Nunez and Sous Chef Jane Martinez both Garifuna Hopkins natives competed with Belcampo Lodge, Walucos, Aasha’s Kitchen, Laru Beya and Jaguar Reef Lodge for a culinary battle celebrating Garifuna Garinagu Cuisine to which we walked away as the Gran Price Winners.    Main course was pan seared Baruru with #lionfish along side calaloo and chaya dressed in coconut milk.  Dessert was a cassava crème brule and the drink was “Sahua” with fever crossed and a dash of brandy.

Even with the weather conditions of down pour rain, wind and limited kitchen accessories the girls kept their wits and were are so proud of you Marcia and Jane for a job well done.  Hamanasi is so proud to have in both in their team!

“Hamanasi Coconut Cake”

Another of our tasty special dessert recipe!

Hamanasi’s COCONUT CAKE

 coconut cake

Ingredients

3/4 pound (3 sticks) unsalted butter

2 cups sugar

5 extra-large eggs at room temperature

1 1/2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract

1 1/2 teaspoons pure almond extract

3 cups all-purpose flour plus more for dusting the pans

1 teaspoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

1 cup milk

4 ounces sweetened shredded coconut

For the frosting: 2015-07-11 20 20 33

1 pound cream cheese, at room temperature

1/2 pound (2 sticks) unsalted butter, at room temperature

3/4 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

1/4 teaspoon pure almond extract

1 pound confectioners’ sugar, sifted

6 ounces sweetened shredded coconut

Directions Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Grease 2 (9-inch) round cake pans, then line them parchment paper. Grease them again and dust lightly with flour. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a paddle attachment, cream the butter and sugar on medium-high speed for 3 to 5 minutes, until light yellow and fluffy. Crack the eggs into a small bowl. With the mixer on medium speed, add the eggs 1 at a time, scraping down the bowl once during mixing. Add the vanilla and almond extracts and mix well. The mixture might look curdled; don’t be concerned. In a separate bowl, sift together the flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt. With the mixer on low speed, alternately add the dry ingredients and the milk to the batter in 3 parts, beginning and ending with dry ingredients. Mix until just combined. Fold in the 4 ounces of coconut with a rubber spatula. Pour the batter evenly into the 2 pans and smooth the top with a knife. Bake in the center of the oven for 45 to 55 minutes, until the tops are browned and a cake tester comes out clean. Cool on a baking rack for 30 minutes, then turn the cakes out onto a baking rack to finish cooling.
Happy Baking & Eating From Hamanasi’s Kitchen Staff

Cassava – Healthy Living

Cassava is a great gluten-free substitute.

Cassava root after harvest before it’s been prepared to cook.

At Hamanasi we are aware that many of our guests have special dietary requirements, from low sugar and nut allergies, to gluten free diets. We want all of our guests to be able to sample to delights of our kitchen and bakery so we use native local produce to substitute certain items that may be incompatible with the dietary requirements. One of these substitutes is cassava, which we use as a substitute when cooking and preparing food for guests with a gluten free diet.

Native to Brazil and the tropical areas of the Americas, Cassava (also know as manioc, tapioca or yuca) is widely grown all over Latin America and the Caribbean, as well as Africa and the South Pacific. A root vegetable with a brown fibrous skin and a fleshy white interior, it has been around since long before the arrival of Columbus. Cassava provided a stable source of food to the Taino, Carib and Arawak populations, especially in the form of cassava bread. While there is evidence of manioc pollen in the Gulf of Mexico lowlands dating to 4600B.C., the earliest evidence of cassava cultivation comes from a 1,400 year old Maya site in El Salvador.
Cassava is the third largest source of food carbohydrates in tropical and sub-tropical regions helping to provide a basic diet to over half a billion people, mainly thanks to its ability to grow under strenuous conditions such as in areas of low rainfall and nutrient low soils.

Once harvested cassava needs to be washed and peeled before it is used, but it can be used in so many ways. When cooked properly to detoxify it, the soft boiled root has a delicate flavor and can be used to replace potatoes in many ways, including as an accompaniment to meat, as a flour in dumplings and gravies, or even fried as chips. Cassava can also be made into a sweeter choice as a crepe or a cake. This typically involves grating the cassava and mixing it with coconut milk or even fresh grated coconut and steaming it.

Belize Gluten-free sweet cassava snack

Cassava is as versatile as it is tasty and is equally good as a sweet gluten-free snack as it is as a starch at meal time.

Cassava is a food with a long list of health benefits. Cassava is very rich in many minerals that are beneficial such as calcium, potassium, iron, phosphorus and manganese. As well as being rich in fibre, it is also rich in carbohydrates, making it a perfect dietary addition for a highly active lifestyle. Along with being gluten free, cassava is high in its levels of saponins, which are a phytochemical responsible for helping to lower the levels of unhealthy cholesterol in the blood stream.
So all the arrows point to cassava being a healthy choice of vegetable for any diet

Talking Diet, A Gluten-Free Alternative at Hamanasi

Belize Gluten-free sweet cassava snack

Cassava is as versatile as it is tasty and is equally good as a sweet gluten-free snack as it is as a starch at meal time.

At Hamanasi we are aware many of our guests have special dietary requirements, from low sugar and nut allergies, vegetarian to gluten free diets.  We want all of our guests to be able to sample to delights of our kitchen and bakery so we use native local produce to substitute certain items that may be incompatible with the dietary requirements.  One of these substitutes is cassava, which we use as a substitute when cooking and preparing food for guests with a gluten free diet.

Where gluten-free food starts, in the ground.

Cassava plant before harvest.

Native to Brazil and the tropical areas of the Americas, Cassava (also know as manioc, tapioca or yuca) is widely grown all over Latin America and the Caribbean, as well as Africa and the South Pacific.  A root vegetable with a brown fibrous skin and a fleshy white interior, it has been around since long before the arrival of Columbus.  Cassava provided a stable source of food to the Taino, Carib and Arawak populations, especially in the form of cassava bread.  While there is evidence of manioc pollen in the Gulf of Mexico lowlands dating to 4600B.C., the earliest evidence of cassava cultivation comes from a 1,400 year old Maya site in El Salvador.

Cassava is the third largest source of food carbohydrates in tropical and sub-tropical regions helping to provide a basic diet to over half a billion people, mainly thanks to its ability to grow under strenuous conditions such as in areas of low rainfall and nutrient low soils.
Cassava is a great gluten-free substitute.

Cassava root after harvest before it’s been prepared to cook.

Once harvested cassava needs to be washed and peeled before it is used, but it can be used in so many ways.  When cooked properly to detoxify it, the soft boiled root has a delicate flavor and can be used to replace potatoes in many ways, including as an accompaniment to meat, as a flour in dumplings and gravies, or even fried as chips.  Cassava can also be made into a sweeter choice as a crepe or a cake.  This typically involves grating the cassava and mixing it with coconut milk or even fresh grated coconut and steaming it.

Cassava is a food with a long list of health benefits.  Cassava is very rich in many minerals that are beneficial such as calcium, potassium, iron, phosphorus and manganese.  As well as being rich in fibre, it is also rich in carbohydrates, making it a perfect dietary addition for a highly active lifestyle.  Along with being gluten free, cassava is high in its levels of saponins, which are a phytochemical responsible for helping to lower the levels of unhealthy cholesterol in the blood stream.

So all the arrows point to cassava being a healthy choice of vegetable for any diet.

Introducing Singanga’s Redesigned Menu, One Delicious Organic Item at a Time.

new organic menu at Hamanasi's Singanga restaurant

Hamanasi’s Singanga restaurant proudly introduces their new organic sustainable vegetarian quiche of the day.

After our resort closure to put the final touches on the new great house and the newly redesigned Singanga Restaurant we introduced many new organic menu items. Many of these new items are organic or vegetarian using sustainable products. Hamanasi’s goal has always been to be a sustainable resort and we take pride in all of our department’s practice of the 3 R’s “Reduce, Reuse and Recycle.” In the grounds department we reuse/recycle by composting. In the bar we recycle wine bottles as aggregate for our cement pathways and our kitchen also practices reusing with a few sustainable menu items. One of the items in our new redesign menu is our “Quiche of the day”.
Like many of our menu items, our quiche are produced with local Belizean products like fresh eggs, cheese and many of the vegetables are grown in our organic sustainable garden. The raw fresh prep vegetable from the night before that went unused are used as the key ingredients for this savory pie.

organic sustainable garden at Hamanasi

Many of the items from Singanga’s menu come from our organic garden.

Some of our new quiche options include tomato, zucchini, yellow and red bell peppers, onions, broccoli and spinach as well as other seasonal vegetables.
Today our feature is spinach from the organic garden along with roasted bell peppers and onions prepared by our baker to entice your taste buds… inquire with your server on our daily variety during your stay at Hamanasi.

“Belizean Storm Salad”

Another of our tasty special salad recipe!

20140313hambz00_dining-1011

 Belizean Storm Salad

Pineapple   1 cup (medium dice)

 Spinach     2 cups (julienned)

Beets         1 cup (med dice)

Cucumber   2 cups (thinly sliced)

 Tomato       1 cup (julienned)

Cilantro       ¼ leaves

Green onion   1 bunch sprigs (for garnish)

 

Toss ingredients together then drizzle dressing over salad

 

Citrus vinaigrette

Lime juice

Orange juice

Olive oil

Salt

Pepper

 

 

Happy Cooking From

Hamanasi Kitchen staff

 

 

“Friday Happy Hour Drink Special: Vitamin C Bomb”

c bomb

It’s Friday, and  tonight’s Hamanasi Happy Hour Special: the “Vitamin C Bomb”!  Using fresh oranges coming from the Stann Creek Valley hills straight into your glass with a splash of Belizean’s #1 rum ~ One Barrel Light rum!  Serve on ice, sit back, relax and enjoy.